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Why CEOs Should Invest in PR Attribution and PR Measurement

CEOs PR Attribution PR Measurement

In recent market estimates, digital online and ad spending is expected to grow at approximately 11% per year through 2021.  Paid search, display ads, social media, online video advertising and email marketing will grow to 46% of advertising budgets. To optimize the ROI on digital marketing spend, CEOs, CCOs, and CMOs need to invest in […]


3 Reasons CEOs Should Ditch Individualistic Bravado

Handsome man humor funny gesture in a mirrorIn my opinion, nothing is more unappealing than ego-driven anything. When arrogance and bravado are the core principles of a leadership team, the result is often one of three things, if not all of them:

1. Your employees will despise you.

2. The press will generate negative stories about your company.

3. Your customers will vote with their feet.

The antics of particular CEOs (who will remain unnamed) notwithstanding, this type of behavior is generally bad for business on a variety of levels, not to mention out of vogue. How a leader operates both in and out of the boardroom defines the company culture, setting the tone for inter-employee communication and the expectations for the group as a whole.

The most successful leaders I’ve encountered are armed with empathy, patience, and intelligence while emphasizing trust and strong team bonds. To prove my point, I tapped a few CEOs whom I respect to provide insight on how they lead without raised voices or harsh words, and why it’s a much better approach to leave inflated egos at the door.

#1–Trust is an “inside job” that will lead to “outside success”

Reprimanding and bullying employees for poor performance can often lead to crushed morale for both the person and the people around them; it may scare up immediate results, but it doesn’t create long-term inspiration. Instead, slowing down and talking things through can often be much more effective.

“As a leader, I make a conscious choice to let bothersome things process and settle before bringing them up,” says Dippak Khurana, Co-founder and CEO of Vserv. “When they surface, I try to make it part of a thoughtful discussion in a face-to-face or small group situation. I’ll state my case, listen to the response, and try to see all perspectives, particularly when it involves big decisions. I’ve found that it builds the most important thing any successful CEO needs: trust.”

Not only can you fix a problem at the root cause, employees will feel safe to express their thoughts and ideas. That environment can propel the whole company forward.

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